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Helen Snyder

Helen Snyder

PhD, Director, Multiplexing Product Management, Cell IDx, a Leica Biosystems Company

Dr Snyder received her PhD in immunology from the University of Cambridge, UK and trained as a postdoctoral fellow at Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, California. Dr. Snyder has over 30 years' experience in immunology research, reagent development, preclinical development of biotherapeutics, and business development of immunoassay and immunodiagnostic products. She has held positions as Associate Professor at the University of California, San Diego, as well as Director of Immunology at Dynavax Technologies and key business development roles at both Solulink Biosciences and Cell IDx. Dr Snyder has over 40 papers and reviews in the areas of immune regulation and vaccine development.

Published Pieces by Helen Snyder

Learn how use of UltraPlex's unique antibody tagging technology allows rapid, simple tissue staining using cocktails of antibodies employing a single antigen retrieval step, minimizing the time to generation of actionable data.

Learn how use of UltraPlex's unique antibody tagging technology allows rapid, simple tissue staining using cocktails of antibodies employing a single antigen retrieval step, minimizing the time to generation of actionable data.

At the Multiplex User Meeting hosted via LabRoots, Helen Snyder, PhD delivered a live session detailing Cell IDx’s UltraPlex chromogenic multiplex IHC technology. Their chromogenic detection system of 3-4 markers simultaneously is developed to run on BOND RX autostainer in 4-5 hours,  providing maximal information on small tissue samples for biomarker discovery. 

At the Multiplex User Meeting hosted via LabRoots, Helen Snyder, PhD delivered a live session detailing Cell IDx’s UltraPlex chromogenic multiplex IHC technology. Their chromogenic detection system of 3-4 markers simultaneously is developed to run on BOND RX autostainer in 4-5 hours,  providing maximal information on small tissue samples for biomarker discovery. 

An unmet need in tissue diagnostics is the ability to simultaneously detect three or more markers on a single tissue specimen, i.e. multiplexing. Unlike other immunoassays, i.e. flow cytometry, ELISA and bead assays, which solely quantify the biomarker in a sample, a multiplex immunoassay quantifies the biomarker, identifies the location of the cell in the tissue and identifies the spatial relationship of the biomarkers with respect to each other.

An unmet need in tissue diagnostics is the ability to simultaneously detect three or more markers on a single tissue specimen, i.e. multiplexing. Unlike other immunoassays, i.e. flow cytometry, ELISA and bead assays, which solely quantify the biomarker in a sample, a multiplex immunoassay quantifies the biomarker, identifies the location of the cell in the tissue and identifies the spatial relationship of the biomarkers with respect to each other.